Anti-Social Networking

I’m awful at social media.

I’ve lost track of how many accounts I’ve started and abandoned within days. And how many I’ve gone back to with every intention of sticking around, only to watch them be ignored and fall once again into oblivion.

Then again, I’m kind of awful at being social in general.

A few years ago, I saw some web comic (or maybe it was an article, I don’t know) that explained introverts and extroverts more or less like this:

Introverts gain energy from being alone and doing alone-type-things, and spend that energy when they interact with others. Extroverts, on the other hand, spend energy when they’re alone or do things on their own, and actually gain energy by being around other people.

I don’t claim this explanation has any real scientific or psychological validity, but it seems to describe things pretty well from where I’m sitting. For me, interacting with other people takes effort. And sometimes that effort could be fairly compared to scaling Everest without the benefit of supplemental oxygen.

Or sherpas.

It’s not that I dislike people, mind you. Or that I don’t enjoy me a party every now and then, or can’t have fun with friends out at a bar or wherever. I like people, but they’re exhausting. And you know, I always find it weird when I see others criticize this view, or when friends claim that I don’t actually like people, because if I did, hanging out with them wouldn’t be so draining.

You can really like running, but you’d be totally justified in collapsing after a marathon.

Shit, this post has gotten way off topic.

The point here is that I’ve decided to give social media another go, make an honest attempt to interact with people, and not let it all fall apart within a week. I’ve resurrected my Instagram account, and I promise to use Twitter as more than just a place to write “I’m tired” every other day. Then there’s Tumblr, which I guess is like having another blog, only somehow less useful.

I’m also on Facebook, because I’m old and most of my friends are old, but I really only use that to share music I’ve found, repost memes, and make (often terrible) jokes. I also complain about technology, but that shouldn’t surprise you.

So, click one of those links (or use the hard-to-see, unclickably-tiny graphics in the “Social” widget on this page) and follow me on the social network of your choice.

 

If I keep this up long enough to clutter your timeline, it’d be a miracle.

The Week, Winding Down

Alex has been on vacation this week, and the extraordinary weather has let us enjoy almost every minute of it. Taking walks around the neighborhood and downtown, visiting the local library, going out to eat—we’ve had a full schedule, but it’s the sort of schedule that recharges you, rather than leaving you a dead, shriveled up husk on the floor.

Although I am sore.

I think I’ve walked twenty miles this week, and since that’s about eighteen more than I’m used to, my legs and feet are…less than happy with me.

It’s raining today, though, so my feet get a break, and Alex and I get to watch television and play board games. Specifically, we get to watch MST3K: The Return, Lost, and Babylon 5, before playing Scrabble, Battleship, and whatever else floats our goat.

Pretty damned perfect end to the week if you ask me.

P.S. I’ve also been using this week to add to, organize, and edit my growing collection of photos (including the one at right, taken in my back yard). And you know what? I think I might be kind of good at it.

 

The Dark Misery of Tech

Everything sucks, it’s a miracle anything works, and I think we should all take a moment to seriously consider setting our every scrap of technology on fire and heading back up into the trees.

I got up this morning with the best of intentions—get an hour of writing done, maybe spend an hour organizing my growing collection of photos in Lightroom, then get outside to enjoy the weather. I really, really, really just wanted to do the bare minimum amount of work to assuage my guilt, then blow off the rest of the day with my daughter.

But no.

No.

Instead, I had to spend that hour or two dealing with a bunch of computer bullshit, and a tech support person I could barely hear over the phone.

What the hell were we thinking, turning our lives and livelihoods over to these poorly-understood, frequently-dysfunctional, little black boxes?

What was I thinking?